The Scroll Saw Lady

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Picking Wood For A Project, Be selective.

Posted by The Scroll Saw Lady on August 28th, 2008

As I said earlier in posts, what wood you use depends on what kind of project you are undertaking.  For projects that will be painted, you can use simply MVF.  For furniture, it’s often a good idea to choose something that will finish well like cedar or oak.

You’ll most likely be getting your wood from a lumber supply store or a home improvement store like Home Depot or Lowe’s.  There are a few things you need to keep in mind when picking out your lumber.

At the lumber yard or store, you’ll find wood boards stacked up in high piles according to length, quality grade, thickness, wood type and many other categories. Even in piles of boards that are grouped as being the same, there are differences in quality, so follow these simple tips for choosing boards that will work for your woodworking projects.

Don’t take boards you don’t want!  Lumberyard novices may feel like they have to take the boards that are first presented to them. Don’t be afraid to examine each board closely and send boards back if they don’t meet your criteria. Why pay for a warped board that won’t work in your current project?

Rejecting boards is not an insult, but a way to pay for wood you can use, so get in the habit early.  Check for straightness.  Hold the board at eye level on one end, with the other end on the ground. Look down the board to see if it has obvious curves or twists. Some projects can handle a curved board, but for beginners, working with curved boards may be too complicated.

Check for splits and warping.  Look over both sides of the board to see if there are any long splits or warped edges. Splits and warps reduce the amount of wood you can use for your project, so pass on boards that would result in a lot of waste.

Knotholes can be considered attractive in some kinds of woodworking projects, so if you’re looking for a really knotty piece of wood, that’s fine.  Otherwise, check your boards for large knotholes that would become waste wood or loose knot pieces that may fall out, causing gaps or weak areas in your cut pieces.

For fine woodworking projects or projects that need a straight, even grain, quarter sawn lumber offers even wood graining, but is more expensive than regular plain sawn lumber. Decide whether you’re willing to pay for the straight grain before choosing boards. Look closely at each board to see if the color is even enough for your project, and that there are not a large number of wormholes or other marred areas. Also check for lumberyard chalk or pen markings or dents that may not come off easily.

Used boards gathered from old barns or other projects can be interesting and fun to work with. However, when buying or choosing reclaimed lumber, check for signs of decay. If the board is spongy or soft, or has signs of fungus on it, it may not hold up well as project wood.

Pressure-treated lumber and chemically treated lumber are for use in outdoor projects, and are better able to withstand temperature and moisture changes. If you’re building a deck or outdoor project, ask for treated lumber. Otherwise, untreated boards are a better choice.

The beginning woodworker should probably start out using softer woods like pine or spruce.  They are easier to work, and you can eventually move up to harder woods like oak and cedar.

You’re almost ready to get started on your first project, now you just need to decide on what to make. Good Luck to you and always follow all safety precautions!

One Response to “Picking Wood For A Project, Be selective.”

  1. The Scroll Saw Lady Says:

    Welcome Scrollsaw Segmentation!